Policy

 

 Evidence Based Public Policy

Like with any threat to public health, we believe that public policy on guns must be guided by evidence and research. We support expanding academic inquiry and evaluation of laws relating to firearms and the nature of gun violence in our state and our nation.


Current Campaign: Safe Storage and Mandatory Reporting of Lost and Stolen Guns

State of Safety Action will be pursuing legislation in the 2019 Oregon Legislature to require safe storage of firearms and reporting to law enforcement when a gun is lost or stolen.

Bill Summary: Cindy Yuille and Steve Forsyth Act

Storing Firearms When Not In Use

  • When not carrying a firearm, a person must secure the firearm with a lock or in a locked container.

  • Failing to secure a firearm is not a crime; the consequence is the same as a speeding ticket.

  • A person who does not properly secure a firearm could receive a fine of up to $500. The usual fine is $165. These are the same fines for driving 11 to 20 miles per hour over the speed limit.

  • If a person fails to secure a firearm when the person knew or should have known that a child under the age of 18 could gain unauthorized access to the firearm, the usual fine is $440 and the fine can be as much as $2,000. These are the same fines for driving more than 30 miles per hour over the speed limit.

  • If a person obtains an unsecured firearm and, in the next four years, the firearm is used to injure another person or another person’s property, the person who failed to secure the firearm must compensate the person who was injured or whose property was damaged.


Securing Firearms During Transfer to Another Person

  • A person must lock a firearm or lock the firearm in a container when delivering the firearm to another person.

  • Transferring an unsecured firearm is not a crime; the consequence is the same as a speeding ticket.

  • A person who transfers an unsecured firearm could receive a fine of up to $500. The usual fine is $165. These are the same fines for driving 11 to 20 miles per hour over the speed limit.

  • If a person transfers an unsecured firearm and, in the next four years, the firearm is used to injure another person or another person’s property, the person who failed to secure the firearm must compensate the person who was injured or whose property was damaged.


Reporting Lost and Stolen Guns

  • A person must report a loss or theft of the person’s firearm to a law enforcement agency where the loss or theft occurred within 24 hours of when the person knew or should have known of the loss or theft.

  • Failing to timely report a lost or stolen firearm is not a crime; the consequence is the same as a speeding ticket.

  • A person who does not make a timely report could receive a fine of up to $1,000. The usual fine is $265. These are the same fines for driving 21 to 30 miles per hour over the speed limit.

  • If a person does not timely report a loss or theft, and, in the next four years, the firearm is used to injure another person or another person’s property, the person who failed to make the timely report must compensate the person who was injured or whose property was damaged.


Supervision of Children with Firearms

  • A person who delivers a firearm to a child under the age of 18 and the firearm is a firearm the child does not own must directly supervise the child’s use of the firearm.

  • Except in the case of a lawful act of self-defense or defense of another person, a child under the age of 18 may possesses a firearm the child does not own only under the direct supervision of an adult.

  • There is no fine imposed on a child or adult for the child’s unsupervised use of a firearm; however, the adult who should have supervised the child is, for the next four years, responsible for any damages to person or property caused by the unsupervised child.


Locks and Containers Requirements

  • A trigger lock, cable lock, or locking container a person uses to comply with the law must meet standards adopted by the Attorney General.


“Strict” Liability

  • Usually, to recover damages, an injured person must prove the other person not only did something wrong but that the wrongful act caused the injury--which can be hard to prove if, for example, an unsecured firearm is stolen and then passes through several hands. To recover damages under the law, all the injured person has to show is that a person failed to secure a firearm, timely report a loss or theft of a firearm, or supervise a child’s use of a firearm.

  • The right to recover damages under the law will not apply if the firearm was used in self-defense or defense of another person.

  • The ability for the injured person to sue the person who violated the law will not have any effect on the injured person’s right to sue anyone else. The injured person could still sue the shooter.